Sports and competition. They go hand-in-hand as an intricate part of today’s society. Whether kids learn cooperation in little league, teens battle it out on a soccer field, college students flock to the final four, or pro players vie for starting positions, most people find athletics somewhere in their life. This obsession with sports drives players of all ages to get better, faster, smarter, and stronger so that they can beat the competition.

Today, using technology in sports training is the next frontier of gaining that competitive edge. According to The Sports Journal, elite athletes improved their performance using perceptual-cognitive training technology. One study cited that these athletes not only got better but also learned faster as a result of using technology in athletics.

Athletes can now complement their exercise, nutrition, and strength training regiments with cognitive and vision training efforts. Using sports technology advancements, athletes can boost their reaction time, sharpen their peripheral vision, and improve their depth perception.

What does this mean on the playing field? It means that these athletes can think faster on their feet and process information more quickly than the competition, making smarter decisions that will result in better performance.

 “Vision dominates about 80 percent of the vast amount of sensory information we take in every second,” explained Michael Clegg, a long-time personal trainer and coach. “Mastering how to use vision is a skill which separates the good from the best in team sports.”

 As athletes search for ways to improve their game, multiple innovation performance technologies will grow in popularity. For years, coaches have encouraged players to “get their head in the game.” Today, more than ever, sports technology advancements allow athletes at all levels to do just that.

Reflexion is not intended to diagnose, treat, or mitigate any disease or condition. It is not intended for use in treating concussions and other brain injuries and has not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for such uses.